Dr Eugene Hollenbach Saved My Sight – In Defence of a Good Man

The original news story

AI am very sad to read this, as I have Dr Eugene Hollenbach to thank for saving my sight, after my optometrist had failed to pick up a haemmorhage in my left eye due to macular degeneration. ” It is just old age” the young optometrist casually said. Then my vision became distorted so I went to OPSM in Hunter Street where the opthalmogist did tests and immediately rang Dr Hollenbach, who agreed to see me as soon as I got there. Dr Hollenbach suggested we try the new Avastin injection, which was a new alternative to current Lucentis. Within a couple of days the bleeding had stopped, my vision improved, and futher scarring and blindness halted. I was one of his patients at John Hunter and then who went regularly to Kurri Hospital for further treatment and yes I had the cocaine eye drops to numb the eye before the needle went in. Great stuff! Worked far more effectivelly than its replacement at the time. Early in his career I rebuked Dr Hollenbach for his lack of bedside manner, but over my regular treatments came to see he was totally committed to helping as many people avoid blindness as possible, possibly to the extent of persevering with cases when he could have walked away. He was in a no-win situation. I feel he was let down by the public hospital system, where he had to rely on staff having everything ready for him to start theatre. These staff were very dedicated but it is a totally different situation to operating in private rooms, which was unaffordable for many elderly. Unlike my initial young optimetrist who seemed content to let to let older people go blind as part of the ageing process, I observed Dr Hollenbach to be a young dctor driven to restore eye health to an increasingly growing population. The statistics in the story do not appear to show how many he treated scessfully.
I continued eye injectiins for MD for eight years while back in UK caring for elderly parents then two moonthas after returning, and before registering for further treatment I had a massive eye haemmorhage on a sunday morning in 2015 and went to JHH outpatients who rang another specialist at home who saw me next morning. She immediately gave me an injection to halt the bleeding and got me in to the top specialists at the Sydney eye hospital who said it was the biggest clot they had ever seen but they no longer operated to remove them although they could inject saline to move it to the side although by now the scarring was such I could no longer see through or past it. As there was a risk of losing the eye completely, the committee of five speciasts agreed, I opted to leave it be. I mention this because these are the kind of situations eye surgeons are faced with, and 100% success against nature is not an option. I am now under the care of the very competent specialst who came to my rescue that sunday, and who is now very cautiiously and with the latest technology trying to save the sight in my other eye. Ten years on, the procedure is now very quick and painless but without it the same situation could happen again. I am eternally grateful to Dr Hollenbach for saving the remaining vision in my left eye that day, and for his ongoing care. My heart goes out to the patients and families who had a sad outcome, but my own observation was that this doctor would try his best to save the sight of as many as possible, whatever it took.I am very sad to read this, as I have Dr Eugene Hollenbach to thank for saving my sight, after my optometrist had failed to pick up a haemmorhage in my left eye due to macular degeneration. ” It is just old age” the young optometrist casually said. Then my vision became distorted so I went to OPSM in Hunter Street where the opthalmogist did tests and immediately rang Dr Hollenbach, who agreed to see me as soon as I got there. Dr Hollenbach suggested we try the new Avastin injection, which was a new alternative to current Lucentis. Within a couple of days the bleeding had stopped, my vision improved, and futher scarring and blindness halted. I was one of his patients at John Hunter and then who went regularly to Kurri Hospital for further treatment and yes I had the cocaine eye drops to numb the eye before the needle went in. Great stuff! Worked far more effectivelly than its replacement at the time. Early in his career I rebuked Dr Hollenbach for his lack of bedside manner, but over my regular treatments came to see he was totally committed to helping as many people avoid blindness as possible, possibly to the extent of persevering with cases when he could have walked away. He was in a no-win situation. I feel he was let down by the public hospital system, where he had to rely on staff having everything ready for him to start theatre. These staff were very dedicated but it is a totally different situation to operating in private rooms, which was unaffordable for many elderly. Unlike my initial young optimetrist who seemed content to let to let older people go blind as part of the ageing process, I observed Dr Hollenbach to be a young dctor driven to restore eye health to an increasingly growing population. The statistics in the story do not appear to show how many he treated scessfully.
I continued eye injectiins for MD for eight years while back in UK caring for elderly parents then two moonthas after returning, and before registering for further treatment I had a massive eye haemmorhage on a sunday morning in 2015 and went to JHH outpatients who rang another specialist at home who saw me next morning. She immediately gave me an injection to halt the bleeding and got me in to the top specialists at the Sydney eye hospital who said it was the biggest clot they had ever seen but they no longer operated to remove them although they could inject saline to move it to the side although by now the scarring was such I could no longer see through or past it. As there was a risk of losing the eye completely, the committee of five speciasts agreed, I opted to leave it be. I mention this because these are the kind of situations eye surgeons are faced with, and 100% success against nature is not an option. I am now under the care of the very competent specialst who came to my rescue that sunday, and who is now very cautiiously and with the latest technology trying to save the sight in my other eye. Ten years on, the procedure is now very quick and painless but without it the same situation could happen again. I am eternally grateful to Dr Hollenbach for saving the remaining vision in my left eye that day, and for his ongoing care. My heart goes out to the patients and families who had a sad outcome, but my own observation was that this doctor would try his best to save the sight of as many as possible, whatever it took.

Published by Eunice C English

FormerFreelance journalist. Poet, writer, artist, photographer. Retired and coping with Parkinson's Plus, macular degeneration and other boring stuff but life is still interesting, if a bit of a challenge!

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